The Monarchs

Candice Singleton, Rosa Cortez, Maria Erostico, Joy Emmitt


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SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PAPERS
Candice Singleton [[siteresearchriparianhabitat:home|http://siteresearchriparianhabitat.wikispaces.com/]]

photo courtesy of www.kidszone.com

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OUR SITE: Off of Hwy 20 on East Side Potter Valley Rd
Turn Right approximately .1 mile on East Side Potter Valley
Water is the East Branch of the Russian River
(Pictures Taken By Candice Singleton)

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The East Branch of the Russian River
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A Spillway in the area
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THE PLANT LIFE: February 28, 2007 (Needs Identifying)
(Pictures Taken By Candice Singleton)
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Maria Erostico Reaserch

Species: Douglas Iris ( Iris douglasiana)

Kingdom: Plantea
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Liliopsida
Order: Asparagales
Family: Iridaceae
Genus: Iris


Origin Of Genus Name: Iris is the Greek Goddess of the Rainbow
Presidio Locations: Found in Serpertine grassland, Serpentine chapparral, Coastal Prairie and the understory of cultural plantation.
Range In State: Coastal ranges of north of Santa Barbara. The Presidio is the type locality in this species.
Description: this native perennial has dark lavender to deep reddish purple flowers. The flower have three sepals, three petals and three stamens. Douglas Iris, also called lavendal, has leathery, dark green, grass-like leaves that sprout from a snake-like roots catching a rhizome. Blooms from March to July.
California Native Uses: Douglas Iris is known to be one of the most important sources because they use it on making robe and basket-making fiber in northern California for a large number of tribes. Coast Miwok have used Douglas Iris to make a tea that induces vomiting. The Pomo and the Klamath have used fibers from the edges of leaves to make a strong rope. The strands on edges have been removed and cleaned with a sharp oblong tool made abalone shells fastened to the thumb. this process was extremely time-consuming a tweleve foot long rope took nearly six weeks to make.